Teasel – Learn about it. Control it.

Young seed head of teasel

Save Long Grove from the Teasel Invasion!

Teasel is a highly invasive plant that is taking over our roadsides.  A single Teasel plant drops over 2,000 seeds, smothering and pushing out native plants that feed and protect our wildlife and beautify our Village.  The result is an ever-spreading single-crop field of Teasel, which upsets our environment, our wildlife and our visual landscape.
Early Spring is a critical time to attack it.   Teasel rosettes are not dormant in Winter, and can be treated as soon as temperatures are above freezing.  They’re easy to spot as other plants have not leafed out yet.
This is what YOU can do to help:
  1. Spray teasel rosettes with a broadleaf herbicide i.e. 2,4-D from your local home center, hardware store or garden center.  This will kill the roots.  Young rosettes can also be dug and pulled out when the soil is moist with the aid of a long dandelion wrench, but it’s important to get the entire long root out of the ground and bagged securely for disposal.
  2. Cut existing teasel stalks at ground level and bag securely for disposal since they can have seeds.  Spray the remaining stalk stump with a broadleaf herbicide, otherwise it will just re-grow.
  3. Plant native grasses or flowers after killing and removing teasel.  This will keep out the return of teasel.

Teasel Rosettes                      Teasel Stalks                             Native Grasses

  

Come to one of our Teasel Workshops.  We will post Teasel Workshops as they become scheduled.  The Long Grove Park District is also offering custom Teasel Workshops to neighborhoods and businesses, upon request.

For more comprehensive information on Teasel…..

…click on the teasel flower (left image) for a 1 page quick guide to teasel control.

….click on the rosette (right image) for a very comprehensive slide show on Teasel.

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Lee Bassett – A Loss to the Park District and the Community

Lee Bassett, past President of the 
Long Grove Park District with
current president, Jane Wittig.

Lee Bassett passed away July 17th at age 88, after a short illness. Lee was a tireless public servant and dedicated much of his time and energy to the betterment of our village. Serving as President of the Long Grove Park District for many years, Lee made many contributions as a local environmentalist. In addition, Lee served on the Historical Society Board for many years and touched the lives of countless local students as a docent at the Ruth Barn.

 Lee was a friend to all, a kind voice of reason, a tireless worker, and a mentor to many.  He made the lives of everyone he touched better.  The Park District, the Historical Society and the entire Long Grove community have lost a beloved friend, a respected community leader and volunteer. 

 At the family’s request, the Park District and Historical Society are hosting an informal gathering of Lee’s friends to share fond remembrances. The open house is at Reed-Turner Nature Center, Wednesday, July 25th from 1 – 4 p.m.

 Lee will certainly be missed by all those that he touched during his years in Long Grove, and our sincere sympathies to his wife, Takako and family.


 

Wetlands- a Vital Part of Your Life

The Importance of Our Wetlands

 The Long Grove-Kildeer Garden Club invites you to join them  Monday, November 13 for a presentation by Jacob Jozefowski of the Lake County Storm Water Management Commission to learn about the importance of our wetlands in Lake Country.

Sandhill cranes in marsh

Wetlands were once a dominant feature of the Illinois landscape and played a large role in reducing flooding, recharging groundwater supplies, filtering pollutants and nutrients, and providing highly productive habitats for plants and animals. We need to clean up our wetlands.  We need to re-establish habitat corridors and reintroduce native species into wetlands.

We need to do this for your environment, for the safety of your homes, and for your health. Come to the meeting and learn how YOU CAN HELP DO THIS.

Guests are always welcome.

 

WHEN: Monday November 13, 2017, 9:30 a.m.

WHERE Reed Turner Nature Center, 3849 Old McHenry Rd, Long Grove

QUESTIONS?  Contact  kathymichas33@gmail.com or call 847-487-6985.

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Autumn Twilight- Meet Some Animals Whooo Fly at Night

Come visit with live birds of the night.

Learn about their unique adaptations that make them highly effective night time predators. After the presentation, you may choose to take a guided walk through the Reed-Turner Woodland and experience this wild preserve as the nocturnal animals do. Watch and listen for the signs of life after dark. Come back to the Nature Center for a campfire and snacks.

This is a family event for ages 6 and up. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Dress for the weather and bring flashlights.

In the event of inclement weather the presentation will be indoors, but the walk and campfire will be cancelled.

DATE: Saturday, October 7 starting at 5:30 p.m.

LOCATION: Reed-Turner Woodland Preserve, 3849 Old McHenry Rd, Long Grove

FEE: $5/person. Capacity limit is 30 participants.

Advance registration is required. Click HERE for REGISTRATION FORM

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Bring Your Sketch Pad and Capture the Beauty of the Woodland

The Reed-Turner Botanic Artists invite anyone with an interest in sketching, drawing, or painting to a Botanic Sketching Afternoon at the Woodland.  The event is open to all. Families are invited.

Lyndsay Muphree (left) will be one of the instructors. She and fellow articst Kim Hee Young are holding Lyndsay’s finished work of a Bat Flower.

Members of the Botanic Arts Circle will help participants select and sketch examples of the Woodland’s beauty.  These artists have years of experience in creating exquisite works of botanic art that focus on the beauty and details of individual plants.  They will share their expertise with you, providing tips on how to approach the development of a botanic sketch along with suggestions on techniques.  This is an opportunity for individuals at any level of experience and skill in art.  Children are welcome but must be accompanied by a parent.

In the event of rain, the event will be held inside the Reed-Turner Nature Center.

There is no fee for this opportunity to explore the beauty and challenges of botanic art.

The event will be on Saturday, June 10, from 1-3 p.m. at the Reed-Turner Woodland Preserve, 3849 Old McHenry Rd in Long Grove.  For further information, contact Lyndsay Murphree at Lyndsay.murphree@gmail.com.

Capacity is limited so advance registration is required.  To register, simply email syoung@lgparks.org with your name, phone number and the number of individuals in your group.

Bring your sketch pad and enjoy this artistic experience of nature.

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